photos of AGADIR City

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photos of AGADIR City

Agadir is a major modern city in the southern part of Morocco. It is of interest primarily because of its location, as it is surrounded by the Anti Atlas, the Sahara Desert on the Atlantic coast with many national parks, and secluded beaches which are all easily accessible.

Photo of one of the beautiful sandy beaches in Agadir
In 1960 the city was hit by an earthquake which destroyed the city including the ancient kasbah. An estimated 15,000 were killed, 12,000 injured and some 35,000 people left homeless. On seeing the devastation the late King Mohammed V said “If Destiny decided the destruction of Agadir, its rebuilding depends on our Faith and Will.” In 1961 the city begun reconstruction two miles south of the epicentre. The city centre was based on a grid system, similar with New York, making it simple to get your bearings and move around. There are wide avenues and boulevards lined with cafes. The architecture is somewhat unusual with lots of low rise concrete buildings in the 1960’s futuristic design with classic Moroccan styles. Back in the late 1960’s and 1970’s it was an ultra modern tourist resort, today some may argue that it looks slightly dated, others would say that this makes it absolutely unique and it really stands out from Casablanca, Rabat, Fez or Marrakech. The city continues to grow at a rapid pace with new developments throughout the edges of the centre.
The population is 678,000 including the nearby towns of Inezgane and Ait Melloul Most locals speak Berber as their first language with Arabic as the second language followed by French, though English is widely spoken in the city.
Agadir is a very tolerant city. The local Berber community are proud of their heritage and culture and are very welcoming to visitors. In a Muslim country where a bar or a casino can be footsteps away from a mosque, a country where homosexuality remains a crime, yet there is an obvious gay community, made up of many older Europeans. Everyone just seems to live and let live in this incredible resort.
Whilst tourism plays a vital role in the city’s economy it remains a major port with a thriving fishing industry, exporting produce and natural resources. If you head north of the city towards the beaches around Tamraght you will pass a small town called Anza where there is a fish processing factory, the smell on hot days can be quite unreal! Having said that the seafood is excellent.
Today the city centre itself is primarily a tourist resort popular with Europeans. It has excellent clean beaches, first class golf courses, health and beauty spas and all the other facilities that European travellers demand.
[edit]Climate
The weather in Agadir is subtropical, yet very dry, since rainfall is scarce and fog is the most common type of moisture. The temperature in summer is 80°F/20°C, with nights cooling off to around 65°F/18°C. Spring and fall experience nights from 57°F/13°C-60°F/15°C, and days around 75°F/24°C. Winter temperatures see nights around 47°F/8°C, with occasional frost, and days around 70°F/21°C. Water temperatures stay relatively mild all year long, with winter water temperatures around 60°F/15°C, spring water temperatures around 65°F/18°C, summer water temperatures around 70°F/21°C, and fall water temperatures of 67°F/19°C. Due to the sea breeze summer temperatures are more comfortable than Marrakech

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